Home / Free Speech / Kenyans feel Mutahi Ngunyi apology insufficient
Mutahi Ngunyi. Photo courtesy of softkenya.com
Mutahi Ngunyi. Photo courtesy of softkenya.com

Kenyans feel Mutahi Ngunyi apology insufficient

Mutahi Ngunyi. Photo courtesy of softkenya.com
Mutahi Ngunyi. Photo courtesy of softkenya.com

Mutahi Ngunyi has made an apology for making disparaging comments on the luo ethnic community and some specific individuals like the Law Society of Kenya (LSK) CEO Apollo Mboya and Raila Odinga

 

 Ngunyi had in a number of tweets casts aspersions on luos progressing because of their affinity to Raila Odinga.  Just before the disparaging tweets, Mutahi Ngunyi had followed Raila Odinga and Uhuru Kenyatta on Twitter and immediately thereafter started comments that can be seen to be targeting Raila and the luo as dependent on him yet he is a failure.  

 

 

 

 


Ngunyi continued being personal on his tweets

 

 

 

Apollo Mboya has since filed a petition with the National Commission and Integration Commission (NCIC) as he says the tweets were personally targeted at him. He wrote to the commission

“In particular, the posts target members of a specific community as lacking individuality and in a state of mental slavery, assertions that are not only false but may very well constitute hate speech directed at specific members of a community (of) which I am a member,” read the letter in part.
“It is my view that the words uttered by Mutahi Ngunyi are intended to incite feelings of contempt, hatred, hostility, violence and/or discrimination against a community on the basis of ethnicity and, therefore, committed an offence under Section 62 of the NCIC Act.”

Kenyans shared their thoughts on the apology, many stating that the apology is not sufficient to exonerate him from criminal culpability.

                                                                                             

 

                     


Kenyans had earlier showed their displeasure at the tweets using the hashtag #ShutMutahiNgunyiUp.

As it stands, the tweets are still on his timeline, something some have argued as insecure as he should at least have deleted them. Mutahi looked remorseful when making the apology in an interview with NTV, perhaps coming to terms with the gravity of his tweets.

How the NCIC deal with this issue will continue to shine a spot light on the commission and its role in stemming hate speech in the country. In the past their perceived favoritism on political leaders or people who hold high offices in the country like Hon. Moses Kuria, Hon. Chirau Ali Makwere and Hon. Alfred Keter among others may offer a view of whether to believe they will stem the vice especially since Ngunyi works with government, specifically the National Youth Service (NYS) where he was contracted to spearhead its restructuring and reform.

About shitemi khamadi

Shitemi is the Kenya Monitor Managing Editor. He trains journalists on basics of journalism, storytelling, conflict sensitive journalism and devolution.

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